“Woman, life, freedom”: Iranian girls cry out against the Ayatollahs’ regime

Iranian girls and young women are crying out against repression and institutional machismo. And they do it from their universities, from their schools… and in the streets. The death of Mahsa Amini after being arrested by the morale police for not wearing the veil properly has unleashed an avalanche of protests in the country.

The Ayatollah regime responded with arrests, violence and censorship, to the point that it has tried to scare celebrities and journalists of the country so that they remain silent and do not disclose content on the internet that could harm the Government. It has also forced citizens to stay at home. However, the efforts of the power of Iran have not borne fruit.

Another death, Nika Shahkarami, it has increased the marches in the streets, packed especially with young women. This minor, who was 17 years old, disappeared last September. Ten days later, her family located her body in a detention center morgue.

Without a veil, with their hands up and shouting to the sky, hundreds of women tour the cities of the country of 31 provinces of Iran. Since then, the drivers sound the horns of their vehicles to support the claims and, at night, the country’s inhabitants can hear proclamations against the regime.

Under the slogan of the Kurdish fighters “Woman, life, freedom”, girls from schools and institutes have expressed their rejection of the two supreme leaders, Ayatollah Khomeini and the current leader Ali Khamenei. Despite the 92 deaths recorded by the NGO Iran Human Rights and the more than 1,500 detainees, the protests have been repeated in schools across the country, shouting “death to the dictator” while trampling images of the rulers. A group of teenagers has been photographed, with a gesture of rejection, against the portrait of the dictators.

But the protests not only take place in the streets and in the classrooms, but also on the internet, where a protest song has become popular, which is already considered a hymn against repression. The piece is called Baraye (Because), from the artist Shervin Hajpourwho was arrested and later put out on bail. The song begins: “For dancing in the streets.” An act that is prohibited.

“For every time we were afraid to kiss our lovers / For the shame of an empty pocket / For the longing for a normal life,” the singer intones. The anthem sounds from the networks, but also from the windows of the houses of the citizens who suffer the repression and from the cars of the drivers who support the marches.

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