They withdraw more than 15,000 liters of oil in a maritime reserved area of ​​Peru

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Park rangers, specialists and volunteers from the National Service of Natural Areas Protected by the State (Sernanp) have been removing more than 15,000 liters of oil of the spill from the La Pampilla refinery, operated by Repsol.

A spill that has especially affected the Ancón Bay, belonging to a reserved area on the central Peruvian coast. Specifically, the spill has compromised the Ancon Reserved Zone (ZRA) and two sectors of the National Reserve System of Guaneras Islands, Islets and Points (RNSIIPG).

15 specialists and park rangers are involved in the cleaning tasks, through the use of two teams skimmers, apparatus used for the recovery of oil from the sea. Furthermore, as pointed out by Sernampa group of volunteers from the Faculty of Environmental Engineering of the National University of Engineering (UNI) have joined the cleaning work.

On the other hand, the Agency for Environmental Assessment and Enforcement (OEFA) has regretted that its team of supervisors have not been able to take samples of the water because the fishermen of the port of Chancaynorth of Lima, have not been allowed.

This official entity called on citizens to allow them to carry out their monitoring and identification of the points affected by the spill in the sea and the beaches of Lima and the neighboring province of Callao.

More than 10,000 cubic meters of sand

For its part, Repsol has stated this Tuesday that it is “closely collaborating” with civil society and the Peruvian authorities “to advance as quickly as possible in the remediation of the areas affected by the oil spill.”

Through a statement, the Spanish oil company has made public that it is “in continuous contact with affected communities” about the spill, “to understand their needs and give them the support they need.”

For the moment, Repsol claims to have removed 10,386 cubic meters of sand compromised, which is equivalent to more than 2,000 containers and will be treated before being returned to the beaches.

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